Always Right

Always Right

Good policing is all about targeting and profiling

by Ian Bell

Nothing infuriates me more than stupidity, and one of the prime examples of stupidity is the belief held by many that everyone should respect the law and that this should apply equally to everyone. Why ? when people who are moral and intelligent do not need laws, as they instinctively refrain from actions which might harm others, and have the good sense and forsight to avoid harming others through thoughtlessness. 

Laws, therefore, are designed for the stupid and the immoral. 

There was a time when this was understood by all, if not quite so blatantly articulated, and deference was the norm.

The ‘upper classes’ were respected by the police, who understood that they were to be given preferential treatment. Some people will be outraged at this ‘discrimination’. ‘Everyone is equal before law’, they say. Save it for the fairies. Good policing is all about targeting and profiling.

There is a world of difference between an unemployed drug addict and a professional person, and equally any intelligent person can see that experience and evidence point to the fact that whites are less likely to commit certain criminal offences than blacks, and Muslim terrorists are most likely to be Asian. 

It’s time the police understood the biological realities of life, and excercised their discretion appropriately.

As for those of us who have the morality and intelligence to determine our own actions without needing to be told, why should we respect the law ?

Laws these days are made by politicians. Now I don’t know about you, but there are very few members of pariament for whom I have an ounce of respect. Laws are made through the ‘views’ of MPs. Laws made by morons are moronic laws. Laws made by traitors are treacherous laws. Why should we respect and obey moronic, treacherous laws ?

At the simplest level, consider the traffic laws. 

Anti-speeding morons will tell you “There’s a 30 mph limit for a reason”. Well, yes, but the reason is that MPs are gutless, politically correct, and anti-motorist. Speed limits in towns and on the country roads and motorways are too low, but you always get the odd cretin who disagrees and whines ‘you’ve got to obey the law’. But now even the government and police have come round to accepting that the speed limits are often wrong. 

Since January 2011 most police forces in England and Wales have adopted new speeding guidelines that allow motorists to do up to 86mph and avoid points on their licence. It means drivers can pay to do a speed awareness course instead, if caught at up to 10% above the limit plus 9mph. At a meeting of the Association of Chief Police Officers, it was announced that 37 out of 44 forces had signed up to the new system.*

Even as far back as 2005 a report in the Sunday Times stated that ministers “believe it would be fairer for limits to be raised by 10mph on certain 30, 40 and 50mph roads”.** If the speed limit is raised on a road, does anyone seriously believe that what was dangerous one day is safe the next ? Of course not. It just means that the politicians were wrong before - or maybe they are wrong now.

The point is that you cannot rely on the judgement of politicians, and hence you cannot trust the law to be right. You should therefore exercise your own judgement, as long as you are capable of this. 

No doubt the same cretins who say I should obey the speed limit when it is 30 will be happy for me to drive at 40 the next day, just because some politicians have said it is all right for me to do so. But I do not need a politician to tell me what to do, and nor do other moral, intelligent Britons. 

In the past Britons had a healthy cynicism towards, and disregard for, the law. This stout yeoman-like approach to life has been steadily eroded by governments seeking to exert complete control over those they regard as their subjects. 

It is time we stood up for ourselves and told the law, and the lawmakers, to go to hell.

*  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13022347

** http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/article150834.ece